Platt Perspective on Business and Technology

Macroeconomics and business

Business and society in general exist in microeconomic and macroeconomic contexts, and most of my business and networking postings have economic implications and are shaped by information economic considerations. This series specifically addresses business and macroeconomics issues.

1. Internet companies, the new-old economy and the mainstreaming of innovation.
2. Internet companies, the new-old economy and the mainstreaming of innovation (cont.) .
3. Monetizing and setting valuations on information – the crucial question.
4. Business and convergent technologies 14 – the economics of the disruptive app in a ubiquitous computing and communications environment.
5. Business and convergent technologies 15 – making novelty a disruptive technology advance.
6. Business and convergent technologies 16 – transaction costs and friction in information economy systems.
7. Global commerce and market partitioning in a ubiquitous computing and communications context.
8. Connecting economies with shared metrics – putting this question into context.
9. Business intelligence as monetizable value, and the nature of business in business valuation.
10. Assumption 3 – stepping back to an economic framework and its assumptions.
11. Assumption 5 – Where are the true boundaries between a globally connected company and its supply chain and value chain context?.
12. Assumption 9 – Selling and giving as connected strategies in an increasingly open source and freeware world.
13. Expanding your business with a dual strategic focus – expanding your headcount?.
14. Online social networking and community when machines think – the case for a financial systems/investment instrument trading SCADA.
15. Reexamining business school fundamentals – supply chains and value chains as drivers of sustaining value.
16. Reexamining business school fundamentals – reading between the microeconomics lines.
17. Reexamining business school fundamentals – macroeconomics, microeconomics and the gap between.
18. Reexamining business school fundamentals – business law in a rapidly changing collaborative and competitive context.
19. Building a client base – part 3: determining what data fields to populate and what data not to collect – outlining a data/information and services flow business model.
20. Business intelligence as a qualitative distinction – a requirement for effective rules of monetization.
21. Business intelligence as a quantitative distinction 1 – framing some fundamental questions.
22. Sustainability as a key driver in creating operational and strategic excellence – and our need to relearn that.
23. Business intelligence as a quantitative distinction 2 – the cost cycle and information.
24. Business intelligence as a quantitative distinction 3 – the cost cycle and information (cont.)
25. Business intelligence as a quantitative distinction 4 – setting information cycle costs and uncertainties.
26. Business intelligence as a quantitative distinction 5 – establishing the normative buyer and seller.
27. Business intelligence as a quantitative distinction 6 – marketplace cycles and the information economy.
28. Business intelligence as a quantitative distinction 7 – buying in on valuation in an information economy.
29. Business intelligence as a quantitative distinction 8 – business valuation and the monetizable value of information assets held.
30. Business intelligence as a quantitative distinction 9 – free-agent business intelligence and open markets.
31. Depreciation of value in non-rivalrous goods and the business intelligence life cycle – 1.
32. Depreciation of value in non-rivalrous goods and the business intelligence life cycle – 2.
33. Open marketplaces, closed markets and bubbles, and the consequences of information gaps.
34. Demand, supply, cost curve elasticity and the impact of quality.
35. Demand, supply, cost curve elasticity and the impact of innovation.
36. Borders and boundaries as firewalls in large-scale regional and global economies.
37. Boundaries and internal organization structure as safe-haven and safety net.
38. Follow the money: nonprofits, not for profits, growth companies and short term profit investments – 1.
39. Follow the money: nonprofits, not for profits, growth companies and short term profit investments – 2.
40. Board room and executive suite musical chairs and the impact of recycling old ideas and perspectives in the face of change.
41. Globalization and the economics-model paradigm.
42. Monetizing social networks and the valuation of social media connectivity – 1: a diversity of participant-side visions.
43. Monetizing social networks and the valuation of social media connectivity – 2: a diversity of provider-side visions.
44. Monetizing social networks and the valuation of social media connectivity – 3: connecting valuation approaches.
45. Monetizing social networks and the valuation of social media connectivity – 4: influence scores 1.
46. Monetizing social networks and the valuation of social media connectivity – 5: influence scores 2.
47. Monetizing social networks and the valuation of social media connectivity – 6: social networking and connection strategies and the focus of influence.
48. China and our increasingly interconnected global economy – 1.
49. Monetizing social networks and the valuation of social media connectivity – 7: objectivity and influencing from a genuine voice.
50. Mining and repurposing of raw data into new types of knowledge – 1.
51. Monetizing social networks and the valuation of social media connectivity – 8: social media diversity and where a high influence score represents influence.
52. China and our increasingly interconnected global economy – 2.
53. Mining and repurposing of raw data into new types of knowledge – 2.
54. Monetizing social networks and the valuation of social media connectivity – 9: who speaks for whom?.
55. Mining and repurposing of raw data into new types of knowledge – 3.
56. China and our increasingly interconnected global economy – 3.
57. Mining and repurposing of raw data into new types of knowledge – 4.
58. Monetizing social networks and the valuation of social media connectivity – 10: putting the puzzle pieces together.
59. China and our increasingly interconnected global economy – 4.
60. Mining and repurposing of raw data into new types of knowledge – 5.
61. China and our increasingly interconnected global economy – 5.
62. Mining and repurposing of raw data into new types of knowledge – 6.
63. China in transition 1 – balancing hope and expectations.
64. Considering a cost-benefits analysis of economic regulatory rules – 1
65. China in transition 2 – confronting the challenges, and the challenge of confrontation.
66. Considering a cost-benefits analysis of economic regulatory rules – 2.
67. The cost of uncertainty, and its equivalence in ad hoc valuation in the commoditization of information.
68. China in transition 3 – putting a change of leadership in context.
69. Considering a cost-benefits analysis of economic regulatory rules – 3.
70. Considering a cost-benefits analysis of economic regulatory rules – 4.
71. China in transition 4 – putting a change of leadership in context – 2 .
72. Considering a cost-benefits analysis of economic regulatory rules – 5.
73. China in transition 5 – putting needs and priorities into perspective – 1.
74. Considering a cost-benefits analysis of economic regulatory rules – 6.
75. China in transition 6 – putting needs and priorities into perspective – 2.
76. Considering a cost-benefits analysis of economic regulatory rules – 7.
77. Connecting into the crowd as a source of insight and market advantage – 1: starting a new series.
78. Perceiving China – East and West 1.
79. Considering a cost-benefits analysis of economic regulatory rules – 8.
80. Perceiving China – East and West 2.
81. Connecting into the crowd as a source of insight and market advantage – 2: considering the inventory of channels and connection points.
82. Perceiving China – East and West 3.
83. Considering a cost-benefits analysis of economic regulatory rules – 9.
84. Connecting into the crowd as a source of insight and market advantage – 3: determining monetizable value.
85. Perceiving China – East and West 4.
86. Considering a cost-benefits analysis of economic regulatory rules – 10.
87. Connecting into the crowd as a source of insight and market advantage – 4: adding in a fuller range of online interaction and crowd participation 1.
88. Perceiving China – East and West 5.
89. Considering a cost-benefits analysis of economic regulatory rules – 11.
90. Connecting into the crowd as a source of insight and market advantage – 5: adding in a fuller range of online interaction and crowd participation 2.
91. Perceiving China – East and West 6.
92. Considering a cost-benefits analysis of economic regulatory rules – 12.
93. Connecting into the crowd as a source of insight and market advantage – 6: collecting the right data and analyzing it -1.
94. Considering a cost-benefits analysis of economic regulatory rules – 13.
95. Connecting into the crowd as a source of insight and market advantage – 7: collecting the right data and analyzing it -2.
96. Perceiving China – East and West 7.
97. Entrepreneurship and freedom.
98. Considering a cost-benefits analysis of economic regulatory rules – 14.
99. Connecting into the crowd as a source of insight and market advantage – 8: collecting the right data and analyzing it -3.
100. Meaning in information theory – a reconsideration 1.
101. Connecting into the crowd as a source of insight and market advantage – 9: collecting the right data and analyzing it -4.
102. Facebook and the challenge of initial public offerings and fair market valuation.
103. Connecting into the crowd as a source of insight and market advantage – 10: collecting the right data and analyzing it -5.
104. Conflict of interest and the need for layered due diligence regulatory separations in the age of online social media.
105. Connecting into the crowd as a source of insight and market advantage – 11: reconsidering market demographics.
106. Meaning in information theory – a reconsideration 2.
107. Connecting into the crowd as a source of insight and market advantage – 12: reconsidering the target market.
108. Macroeconomics and the fallacy of a pure meritocracy system – 1: the basic challenge.
109. Connecting into the crowd as a source of insight and market advantage – 13: brands and brand loyalty.
110. Macroeconomics and the fallacy of a pure meritocracy system – 2: setting the basic parameters.
111. Macroeconomics and the fallacy of a pure meritocracy system – 3: operationalizing and enforcing best practices.
112. Addressing a common thread running through our recent economic and marketplace challenges – 1.
113. Macroeconomics and the fallacy of a pure meritocracy system – 4: internalizing ethical best practices into corporate cultures and management and leadership training.
114. When shareholder value becomes an enemy of strategy and strategic planning.
115. Addressing a common thread running through our recent economic and marketplace challenges – 2.
116. Macroeconomics and the fallacy of a pure meritocracy system – 5: adding in supply chain and related systems 1.
117. Macroeconomics and the fallacy of a pure meritocracy system – 6: adding in supply chain and related systems 2.
118. Making regulation work 1: predictability and the cost and benefits of regulatory oversight.
119. Macroeconomics and the fallacy of a pure meritocracy system – 7: taking a global perspective.
120. Making regulation work 2: positive and negative regulatory specificity.
121. Making regulation work 3: political pressures and their impact.
122. Thoughts of China for after its 2012 power transitions 1: welcome to the goldfish bowl.
123. Thoughts of China for after its 2012 power transitions 2: setting the stage for 2013 – 1.
124. Thoughts of China for after its 2012 power transitions 3: setting the stage for 2013 – 2.
125. Regulatory oversight, prudent business practices and risk allocation – 1: setting a foundation for discussion.
126. Thoughts of China for after its 2012 power transitions 4: setting the stage for 2013 – 3.
127. Thoughts of China for after its 2012 power transitions 5: setting the stage for 2013 – 4.
128. Regulatory oversight, prudent business practices and risk allocation – 2: preparing for impending change.
129. Thoughts of China for after its 2012 power transitions 6: welcome to the goldfish bowl, continued.
130. Regulatory oversight, prudent business practices and risk allocation – 3: planning and execution.
131. Telecommuting and the marketplace transition to the telecompany 1 – defining the term and putting this business model into perspective.
132. Telecommuting and the marketplace transition to the telecompany 2 – defining the business model in a telecompany and virtual business context 1.
133. Telecommuting and the marketplace transition to the telecompany 3 – defining the business model in a telecompany and virtual business context 2.
134. Telecommuting and the marketplace transition to the telecompany 4 – defining the business model in a telecompany and virtual business context 3.
135. Telecommuting and the marketplace transition to the telecompany 5 – hybrid business models.
136. Deterministic, semi-deterministic and stochastic business models, or fun with business numbers.
137. Quantifying business intelligence valuation in terms of systems-indeterminacy 1: setting out the basic parameters .
138. Quantifying business intelligence valuation in terms of systems-indeterminacy 2: setting upper and lower limits as a due diligence exercise.
139. Quantifying business intelligence valuation in terms of systems-indeterminacy 3: setting upper and lower limits as a due diligence exercise 2.
140. Quantifying business intelligence valuation in terms of systems-indeterminacy 4: unique and one-off business intelligence offerings.
141. Quantifying business intelligence valuation in terms of systems-indeterminacy 5: deterministic and stochastic valuation models and methodologies and their alternatives 1.
142. Considering the nature and qualities of money 1: standard nationally-based and virtual money 1.
143. Quantifying business intelligence valuation in terms of systems-indeterminacy 6: deterministic and stochastic valuation models and methodologies and their alternatives 2.
144. Considering the nature and qualities of money 2: standard nationally-based and virtual money 2.
145. Quantifying business intelligence valuation in terms of systems-indeterminacy 7: deterministic and stochastic valuation models and methodologies and their alternatives 3.
146. Considering the nature and qualities of money 3: regulating bitcoin and its peer currency alternatives.
147. Quantifying business intelligence valuation in terms of systems-indeterminacy 8: deterministic and stochastic valuation models and methodologies and their alternatives 4.
148. Considering the nature and qualities of money 4: crowdsourcing valuation and the peer-to-peer model 1.
149. Quantifying business intelligence valuation in terms of systems-indeterminacy 9: information determinacy and indeterminacy and the prediction of value 1.
150. Considering the nature and qualities of money 5: crowdsourcing valuation and the peer-to-peer model 2.
151. Quantifying business intelligence valuation in terms of systems-indeterminacy 10: information determinacy and indeterminacy and the prediction of value 2.
152. Considering the nature and qualities of money 6: governmental valuation and the peer-to-peer model.
153. Quantifying business intelligence valuation in terms of systems-indeterminacy 11: information determinacy and indeterminacy and the prediction of value 3.
154. China and its transition imperatives 1: at one year plus, after Xi Jinping’s ascension to power.
155. Considering the nature and qualities of money 7: bitcoin and peer-to-peer currencies from a broader monetary economic perspective.
156. Quantifying business intelligence valuation in terms of systems-indeterminacy 12: information determinacy and indeterminacy and the prediction of value 4.
157. China and its transition imperatives 2: considering challenges faced 1.
158. Quantifying business intelligence valuation in terms of systems-indeterminacy 13: open source and crowdsourced business intelligence.
159. China and its transition imperatives 3: considering challenges faced 2.
160. Quantifying business intelligence valuation in terms of systems-indeterminacy 14: reconsidering the basic model.
161. China and its transition imperatives 4: considering challenges faced 3.
162. Considering a cost and benefits analysis of innovation 1: supply side and demand side innovation adaptation curves 1.
163. China and its transition imperatives 5: considering challenges faced 4.
164. Considering a cost and benefits analysis of innovation 2: supply side and demand side innovation adaptation curves 2.
165. China and its transition imperatives 6: Xi Jinping’s challenge 1.
166. Considering a cost and benefits analysis of innovation 3: adding evolutionary and revolutionary change as an ongoing process.
167. China and its transition imperatives 7: Xi Jinping’s challenge 2.
168. Considering the nature and qualities of money 8: the due diligence and risk management issues of bitcoin wealth and how they might be addressed.
169. Considering a cost and benefits analysis of innovation 4: determining what to retain in-house and what to outsource to supply chain and other business to business partners 1.
170. China and its transition imperatives 8: moving from rule by man to rule by law 1.
171. The power of groceries in projecting national strength 1 – setting the stage for this discussion.
172. Considering the nature and qualities of money 9: some further thoughts on online peer-to-peer currency exchanges as a weakest link.
173. Innovation, disruptive innovation and market volatility 1: considering businesses and outside investors and their dynamics.
174. Considering a cost and benefits analysis of innovation 5: determining what to retain in-house and what to outsource to supply chain and other business to business partners 2.
175. China and its transition imperatives 9: moving from rule by man to rule by law 2.
176. The power of groceries in projecting national strength 2 – thinking through media and messages 1.
177. Considering the nature and qualities of money 10: considering recent FINRA and US IRS decisions and their consequences.
178. Innovation, disruptive innovation and market volatility 2: modeling and understanding change and innovation per se 1.
179. Considering a cost and benefits analysis of innovation 6: determining what to retain in-house and what to outsource to supply chain and other business to business partners 3.
180. Considering the nature and qualities of money 11: thinking ahead to the next peer-to-peer currency generation 1.
181. The power of groceries in projecting national strength 3 – thinking through media and messages 2.
182. China and its transition imperatives 10: facing and confronting the core, most fundamental challenge 1.
183. Innovation, disruptive innovation and market volatility 3: modeling and understanding change and innovation per se 2.
184. Considering a cost and benefits analysis of innovation 7: licensing agreements 1.
185. Considering the nature and qualities of money 12: thinking ahead to the next peer-to-peer currency generation 2.
186. The power of groceries in projecting national strength 4 – adding in from anywhere to anywhere communications and interactive online access 1.
187. China and its transition imperatives 11: facing and confronting the core, most fundamental challenge 2.
188. Developing strategy from a solid foundation 1: start with your underlying assumptions.
189. Considering a cost and benefits analysis of innovation 8: licensing agreements 2.
190. China and its transition imperatives 12: facing and confronting the core, most fundamental challenge 3.
191. Considering the nature and qualities of money 13: rethinking peer-to-peer currency exchanges.
192. The power of groceries in projecting national strength 5 – adding in from anywhere to anywhere communications and interactive online access 2.
193. Developing strategy from a solid foundation 2: a case study example of the consequences of a priori underlying assumptions 1.
194. Innovation, disruptive innovation and market volatility 4: modeling and understanding change and innovation per se 3.
195. Considering a cost and benefits analysis of innovation 9: the two faces of patent protection.
196. Building for an effective portfolio of marketable offerings 1: setting a manufacturing context.
197. Developing strategy from a solid foundation 3: a case study example of the consequences of a priori underlying assumptions 2.
198. China and its transition imperatives 12.5: an inserted news update re Hong Kong.
199. Innovation, disruptive innovation and market volatility 5: modeling and understanding change and innovation per se 4.
200. Building for an effective portfolio of marketable offerings 2: building an analytical tool set 1.

This guide is continued at Macroeconomics and Business 2.

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