Platt Perspective on Business and Technology

Ubiquitous computing and communications – everywhere all the time

I have been assembling a series on new and emerging technologies, with a focus on the development of both wired and wireless broadband and its implications when connected to new computational and data resources. We are currently entering a transition point that is going to have much farther reaching impact than happened with the development of the graphical user interface and the mainstreaming of the personal computer. This series touches on a number of aspects of this transition as new “everywhere, all the time” computational and communications resources come online and become standard to our lives.

Numbers to the left in the following list correspond to numbered postings in the core series Business and Convergent Technologies.

1. A new emerging landscape of opportunity.
2. Connecting, networking, accessing computer power and information everywhere all the time.
3. Moving from 2 to 3 dimensions online with virtual reality.
4. Virtual reality in search of the killer app.
5. Will any single killer app define virtual reality?.
6. Virtual reality and the implications of many worlds.
7. Ubiquitous computing and the level playing field.
8. Web 2.0, ubiquitous computing and the neutral playing field.
9. Massive databases, cloud computing and the killer data app.
10. Who owns our data and who accesses it: a rapidly changing landscape for identity, privacy and personal security.
11. Who owns our data and who accesses it part 2: healthcare informatics, public need and personal privacy.
12. Knowledge by shared effort and public consensus.
13. The evolution and co-evolution of technology, marketplace and community.
14. The economics of the disruptive app in a ubiquitous computing and communications environment.
15. Making novelty a disruptive technology advance.
16. Transaction costs and friction in information economy systems.
17. 1000 points of light: the proliferation and evolution of interactive online options.
18. Towards a process-based model of information technology evolution.
19. Information system ecologies in a ubiquitous computing and communications context.
20. Access and opportunity, and making choices of global impact.
21. Global commerce and market partitioning in a ubiquitous computing and communications context.
22. Enabling technologies and technology leapfrogging.
23. An open letter to UN-GAID.
24. Orphan issues and poster child priorities.
25. An open letter to UN-GAID regarding Haiti and its recent earthquake disaster.
26. Creating societal as well as personal value through social networking.
27. Interoperability, connectivity and cooperation agreements.
28. Charting a course for action and developing and sharing best practices for emergency responses.
29. Communications and coordination of shared effort.
30. How do you prepare for extreme societal dislocations?.
31. Ubiquitous computing and communications and the implications of always on.
32. Ubiquitous computing and communications and the changing face of the news.
33. Online social networking and its impact on social discourse and democratic processes.
34. Ubiquitous computing, social networking and business intelligence.
35. Ubiquitous computing and scaling for change.
36. Crowd sourcing, open innovation and open organization – 1 (see Social Networking and Business for more in this sub-series, with a focus on marketing.)
37. The myth of usability – and the impact of crowd sourcing as needs complexity expands.
38. All the time and everywhere, and green – moving towards a more responsive computing and communications framework.
39. Social networking as an essential driver for effective green technology.
40. Moving genes and genomes back into the open commons and genetic information into open source.
41. Scalability and usability in the online experience – information flow and the Red Queen’s challenge.
42. Online social networking and community when machines think – an emerging reality – posting 1 in intelligent infrastructure series.
43. Online social networking and community when machines think – top-down or bottom-up artificial intelligence? – posting 2 in intelligent infrastructure series.
44. Online social networking and community when machines think – next generation SCADA systems as paradigm for next generation social networks – posting 3 in intelligent infrastructure series.
45. Online social networking and community when machines think – the case for a financial systems/investment instrument trading SCADA – posting 4 in intelligent infrastructure series.
46. Online social networking and community when machines think – securing flexible systems against threats – posting 5 in intelligent infrastructure series.
47. Online social networking and community when machines think – securing flexible systems against threats, part 2 – posting 6 in intelligent infrastructure series.
48. The myth of the technically sweet solution – the need to identify and address problems in context.
49. Robin Dunbar and the limits to social networking – a fundamental question of purpose and definition.
50. Some thoughts on the co-evolution of the internet and globalization.
51. Does the internet preserve or limit diversity?.
52. Reexamining business school fundamentals – macroeconomics, microeconomics and the gap between.
53. Google and Verizon – net neutrality and the consequences of short term perspectives.
54. Business social networking to meet human needs: Part 1 – a need for shared best practices.
55. Business social networking to meet human needs: Part 2 – local online and the pressure for customer-aware best practices.
56. Business social networking to meet human needs: Part 3: spam is in the eye of the beholder.
57. Business social networking to meet human needs: Part 4: change as the only constant.
58. Stuxnet, cyber warfare and the challenge of the intelligent infrastructure: part 1 in a series on better understanding and resolving cyber conflict.
59. Stuxnet and beyond – and even knowing when you have been compromised: part 2 in a series on better understanding and resolving cyber conflict.
60. Stuxnet and the democratization of warfare: part 3 in a series on better understanding and resolving cyber conflict.
61. Creating the in-house information commons – creating the networking resource mix that supports your needs.
62. Stuxnet and the evolution of system vulnerabilities: part 4 in a series on better understanding and resolving cyber conflict.
63. Stuxnet and the evolution of vulnerabilities emergent to system complexity: part 5 in a series on better understanding and resolving cyber conflict.
64. Stuxnet and the evolution threat assessments and responses with system complexity: part 6 in a series on better understanding and resolving cyber conflict.
65. Stuxnet, cyber-conflict threats and online protocols and standards: part 7 in a series on better understanding and resolving cyber conflict.
66. Conceptually separating back end infrastructure from front end user interface to improve functional transparency and user experience.
67. Stuxnet, internet traffic rerouting and next generation protocol-based vulnerabilities: part 8 in a series on better understanding and resolving cyber conflict.
68. Stuxnet and beyond – moving towards a new paradigm for information security due diligence and risk remediation: part 9 in a series on better understanding and resolving cyber conflict.
69. The China Conundrum and its implications for international cyber-security – 1.
70. Stuxnet and beyond – reason and emotion as drivers for both cyber-attack and defense: part 10 in a series on better understanding and resolving cyber conflict.
71. The China Conundrum and its implications for international cyber-security – 2.
72. The China Conundrum and its implications for international cyber-security – 3.
73. Stuxnet and the evolution of truth and myth – a January, 2011 update: part 11 in a series on better understanding and resolving cyber conflict.
74. Stuxnet – some further thoughts re my January, 2011 update: part 12 in a series on better understanding and resolving cyber conflict.
75. Stuxnet and its effects – thinking through the scenarios and their consequences: part 13 in a series on better understanding and resolving cyber conflict.
76. The China Conundrum and its implications for international cyber-security – 4.
77. The China Conundrum and its implications for international cyber-security – 5.
78. The China Conundrum and its implications for international cyber-security – 6.
79. The China Conundrum and its implications for international cyber-security – 7.
80. China, Egypt and state control of cyberspace.
81. China, Egypt and state control of cyberspace – the China response.
82. The China Conundrum and its implications for international cyber-security – 8.
83. The China Conundrum and its implications for international cyber-security – 9.
84. China, Egypt and state control of cyberspace – the China response, part 2.
85. Virtualizing and outsourcing infrastructure – 4: expenses and savings.
86. The China Conundrum and its implications for international cyber-security – 10.
87. The China Conundrum and its implications for international cyber-security – 11.
88. Discerning the 21st century workforce – preparing to succeed in it – 1.
89. Discerning the 21st century workforce – preparing to succeed in it – 2.
90. Monoculture and ecological diversity as a paradigm for modeling cyber risk – 2.
91. Patterns of popularity – an unexpected web analytics finding for this blog.
92. First Stuxnet and then Stars – a continuing cyber-security story: part 14 in a series on better understanding and resolving cyber conflict.
93. The China Conundrum and its implications for international cyber-security – 12.
94. Optimizing business processes to optimize the customer experience – 1.
95. Optimizing business processes to optimize the customer experience – 2.
96. Cloud computing as enabler to true ubiquitous computing and communications -1.
97. When global marketplace diversity crosses the boundaries of custom, culture and legal norms: part 4 in a series on marketplace diversity.
98. Cloud computing as enabler to true ubiquitous computing and communications -2.
99. When information becomes cheap and ubiquitous attention becomes rare and costly.
100. Applying an evolutionary model to information management and business practices.
101. Social networking and maintaining a professional image – an update.
102. Filter bubbles and the limitations of automation in selective search – 1.
103. Social networking and creating an ethical framework.
104. Filter bubbles and the limitations of automation in selective search – 2.
105. Marketplace diversity and navigating a path forward in the face of ongoing change: part 9 in a series on marketplace diversity. See also Business Strategy and Operations, postings 160 and loosely following.
106. Stuxnet – a more detailed analysis of its code and update on this still unfolding story: part 15 in a series on better understanding and resolving cyber conflict.
107. When people become nodes in largely automated information management systems.
108. Creating positive, individually and societally beneficial ubiquitous computing and communications.
109. Social protest, civil disobedience and discerning the boundaries of the acceptable.
110. Some thoughts towards a shared moral and legal framework for a ubiquitously connected and interdependent world.
111. Full cycle cybersecurity and the need to identify and address potential gaps – firmware as an emerging threat area.
112. Connecting everywhere and all the time, and its impact on structure in markets and organizations – 1: starting a new series.
113. Always connected and the emergence of ubiquitously shared meaning.
114. Connecting everywhere and all the time, and its impact on structure in markets and organizations – 2: finding the right organizational complexity balance.
115. Always connected and the emergence of ubiquitously shared meaning – how this is changing us.
116. The China Conundrum and its implications for international cyber-security – 13.
117. Connecting everywhere and all the time, and its impact on structure in markets and organizations – 3: finding the right organizational complexity balance, continued.
118. Some thoughts on the 10th anniversary of 9-11.
119. Connecting everywhere and all the time, and its impact on structure in markets and organizations – 4: transitioning through change as a strategic, operational initiative – 1.
120. Connecting everywhere and all the time, and its impact on structure in markets and organizations – 5: transitioning through change as a strategic, operational initiative – 2.
121. Designing social media and other information-rich tools for transactional memory.
122. The China Conundrum and its implications for international cyber-security – 14.
123. Connecting everywhere and all the time, and its impact on structure in markets and organizations – 6: transitioning through change as a strategic, operational initiative – 3.
124. Monoculture and ecological diversity as a paradigm for modeling cyber risk – 3.
125. Connecting everywhere and all the time, and its impact on structure in markets and organizations – 7: transitioning through change as a strategic, operational initiative – 4.
126. The China Conundrum and its implications for international cyber-security – 15.
127. Connecting everywhere and all the time, and its impact on structure in markets and organizations – 8: organization in an everywhere all the time connected context – 1.
128. The China Conundrum and its implications for international cyber-security – 16.
129. When silo walls mean there is no overall corporate culture – 1.
130. Connecting everywhere and all the time, and its impact on structure in markets and organizations – 9: organization in an everywhere all the time connected context – 2.
131. When silo walls mean there is no overall corporate culture – 2.
132. The China Conundrum and its implications for international cyber-security – 17.
133. The China Conundrum and its implications for international cyber-security – 17.5: a supplemental series posting.
134. The China Conundrum and its implications for international cyber-security – 18.
135. When silo walls mean there is no overall corporate culture – 3.
136. The China Conundrum and its implications for international cyber-security – 19.
137. When silo walls mean there is no overall corporate culture – 4.
138. The China Conundrum and its implications for international cyber-security – 20.
139. Our humanity and our human boundaries when we are everywhere all the time connected.
140. The China Conundrum and its implications for international cyber-security – 21.
141. Navigating the bring your own tech puzzle – 1: building a framework for understanding and managing this emerging trend.
142. Navigating the bring your own tech puzzle – 2: who owns IT?.
143. The China Conundrum and its implications for international cyber-security – 22.
144. Navigating the bring your own tech puzzle – 3: connecting IT and HR policy and practice.
145. Meme tracking as a crowd sourcing killer app.
146. Navigating the bring your own tech puzzle – 4: cyber-security and related due diligence concerns.
147. Internet infrastructure and the democratization of the internet.
148. Romania and North Korea – a brief tale of two generations.
149. Usage challenges that drive the evolution and growth of information technology – 1.
150. Usage challenges that drive the evolution and growth of information technology – 2.
151. Usage challenges that drive the evolution and growth of information technology – 3.
152. Usage challenges that drive the evolution and growth of information technology – 4.
153. The China Conundrum and its implications for international cyber-security – 23.
154. Interoperability, third party provider support and first mover advantage – 1.
155. Interoperability, third party provider support and first mover advantage – 2.
156. Mining and repurposing of raw data into new types of knowledge – 1.
157. Interoperability, third party provider support and first mover advantage – 3.
158. Mining and repurposing of raw data into new types of knowledge – 2.
159. Interoperability, third party provider support and first mover advantage – 4.
160. Mining and repurposing of raw data into new types of knowledge – 3.
161. Mining and repurposing of raw data into new types of knowledge – 4.
162. Interoperability, third party provider support and first mover advantage – 5.
163. Mining and repurposing of raw data into new types of knowledge – 5.
164. Interoperability, third party provider support and first mover advantage – 6.
165. Mining and repurposing of raw data into new types of knowledge – 6.
166. Interoperability, third party provider support and first mover advantage – 7.
167. Interoperability, third party provider support and first mover advantage – 8.
168. Technology advancement and the productivity paradox – 1: the need for a technology inclusion and implementation policy.
169. Technology advancement and the productivity paradox – 2: planning for an effective technology implementation policy.
170. Technology advancement and the productivity paradox – 3: unique value propositions and blue ocean strategies.
171. Technology advancement and the productivity paradox – 4: the selection, implementation and phase-out cycle 1.
172. Technology advancement and the productivity paradox – 5: the selection, implementation and phase-out cycle 2.
173. Understanding the crowd and how it can be misused as a source of insight – 1: in search engines and their underlying algorithms.
174. Understanding the crowd and how it can be misused as a source of insight – 2: crowd sourcing and business intelligence.
175. Developing and managing productivity tools so as to encourage and promote productivity – 1.
176. Developing and managing productivity tools so as to encourage and promote productivity – 2.
177. Big data 1: the emergence of the demographic of one.
178. Developing and managing productivity tools so as to encourage and promote productivity – 3.
179. Big data 2: what data and who owns it?
180. Big data 3: data access and use, ownership and safeguards as a matter of law.
181. Big data 4: who owns it? (part 2).
182. Big data 5: accuracy and error correction from the business perspective.
183. Big data 6: accuracy and error correction from the consumer perspective.
184. Big data 7: utopian and dystopian visions, and evolutionary pressures toward a more realistic middle ground.
185. Information systems security and the ongoing consequences of always being reactive – 1.
186. Information systems security and the ongoing consequences of always being reactive – 2.
187. Information systems security and the ongoing consequences of always being reactive – 3: moving towards proactive controls 1.
188. Information systems security and the ongoing consequences of always being reactive – 4: moving towards proactive controls 2.

Supplemental postings:

1. Social networking and online marketing – and life as the boundaries blur
2. All the time, everywhere can mean well past midnight, and still actively connected.
3. Monetizing and setting valuations on information – the crucial question.
4. Botnets and social networking, and the two sides of automated systems.
5. Social networking and keeping life in balance.
6. Social networking and staying connected – identifying and avoiding single points of failure.
7. Connecting economies with shared metrics – putting this question into context.
8. Nonprofits and blue ocean strategies.
9. The perils of top-down versus bottom-up.
10. Assumption 1 – stand-alone and networked.
11. Assumption 2 – Moore’s law and its successors?.
12. Assumption 8 – Cultural diversity in the all the time and everywhere connected context.

For bottom of first directory page:
This directory is continued, starting with posting 189 at Ubiquitous Computing and Communications – everywhere all the time 2.

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  1. […] November 21, 2009 I posted a supplemental entry to this series on Monetizing and setting valuations on information – the crucial question. I am […]

  2. […] get out of my mind, and it in fact played a role in my assembling this blog posting series: Business and Convergent Technologies. The comment, which I responded to in general terms at the time, asked me to share my opinion on […]

  3. […] point for potential friction and conflict in setting schedules and priorities. I add this into my Ubiquitous Computing and Communications – everywhere all the time category as this is a problem we will really see emerging as a consequence of our growing all the […]

  4. […] I have touched upon from several perspectives in my Macroeconomics and Business series and also in Ubiquitous Computing and Communications – everywhere all the time. One point I have raised several times in this context is that a truly successful disruptive […]

  5. […] have been posting to a series: Ubiquitous Computing and Communications – everywhere all the time that I have developed with the prospects of revolutionary change in mind, and I now want to face […]

  6. […] • Social Networking and Business • Ubiquitous computing and communications – everywhere all the time […]


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