Platt Perspective on Business and Technology

United Nations Global Alliance for ICT and Development (UN-GAID)

1. An Open Letter to UN-GAID.
2. An open letter to UN-GAID regarding Haiti and its recent earthquake disaster.
3. Creating societal as well as personal value through social networking.
4. Interoperability, connectivity and cooperation agreements.
5. Charting a course for action and developing and sharing best practices for emergency responses.
6. Communications and coordination of shared effort.
7. How do you prepare for extreme societal dislocations?.
8. Ubiquitous computing and communications and the implications of always on.
9. Planning, scalability and flexibility in emergency and disaster response systems.
10. When no infrastructure is left standing.
11. Proactively facing crisis and change management as separate points on a single continuum.
12. Citizenship in an increasingly global context 1: shareholder value, stakeholder value, and openly-sourced social value.
13. Citizenship in an increasingly global context 2: membership, citizenship, loyalty and belonging.
14. Commoditizing the standardized, commoditizing the individually customized 14: on-site 3-D printing, and acute disaster response and its follow-up. See Business strategy and operations – 2 and Business strategy and operations – 3, postings 363 and loosely following for other postings to this series.
15. Commoditizing the standardized, commoditizing the individually customized 15: redefining change and technological obsolescence.
16. Developing critical infrastructure from a human and a societal perspective 1. This posting is Part 1 to a multi-part case study on information and communications systems development in rural Tanzania, as that could be applied to further developing their national education system.
17. Developing critical infrastructure from a human and a societal perspective 2.
18. Developing critical infrastructure from a human and a societal perspective 3.
19. Developing critical infrastructure from a human and a societal perspective 4.
20. Developing critical infrastructure from a human and a societal perspective 5.
21. Developing critical infrastructure from a human and a societal perspective 6.
22. Big data and the assembly of global insight out of small scale, local and micro-local data 7: reconsidering the digital divide. See Reexamining the Fundamentals, section IV for other postings in this series. I include this posting here in this directory as a continuation of my series: Developing Critical Infrastructure from a Human and a Societal Perspective (see above), as both those postings and this one focus on a case study provided by my experience in Tanzania as its government and its educational system seek to cross the digital divide.
23. Communicating more effectively as a job and career skill set 17: finding best practices in the face of ongoing change. See Guide to Effective Job Search and Career Development – 3 for other postings to this series.
24. Big data and the assembly of global insight out of small scale, local and micro-local data 8: reconsidering the digital divide 2.
25. Planning infrastructure to meet specific goals and needs, and not in terms of specific technology solutions 1.
26. Planning infrastructure to meet specific goals and needs, and not in terms of specific technology solutions 2.
27. Planning infrastructure to meet specific goals and needs, and not in terms of specific technology solutions 3.
28. Planning infrastructure to meet specific goals and needs, and not in terms of specific technology solutions 4.
29. Planning infrastructure to meet specific goals and needs, and not in terms of specific technology solutions 5.
30. Planning infrastructure to meet specific goals and needs, and not in terms of specific technology solutions 6.
31. Planning infrastructure to meet specific goals and needs, and not in terms of specific technology solutions 7.
32. Planning infrastructure to meet specific goals and needs, and not in terms of specific technology solutions 8.
33. Planning infrastructure to meet specific goals and needs, and not in terms of specific technology solutions 9.
34. Vietnam, doi moi and the search for business and economic strength and global relevance 1.
35. Vietnam, doi moi and the search for business and economic strength and global relevance 2: an agrarian world and a business and commerce world 1.
36. Vietnam, doi moi and the search for business and economic strength and global relevance 3: an agrarian world and a business and commerce world 2.
37. Vietnam, doi moi and the search for business and economic strength and global relevance 4: the quest for an enabling 21st century infrastructure 1.
38. Planning infrastructure to meet specific goals and needs, and not in terms of specific technology solutions 10.
39. Vietnam, doi moi and the search for business and economic strength and global relevance 5: the quest for an enabling 21st century infrastructure 2.
40. Vietnam, doi moi and the search for business and economic strength and global relevance 6: the quest for an enabling 21st century infrastructure 3.
41. Vietnam, doi moi and the search for business and economic strength and global relevance 7: considering Vietnam in an interconnected global context 1.
42. Vietnam, doi moi and the search for business and economic strength and global relevance 8: considering Vietnam in an interconnected global context 2.
43. Planning infrastructure to meet specific goals and needs, and not in terms of specific technology solutions 11.
44. Vietnam, doi moi and the search for business and economic strength and global relevance 9: considering Vietnam in an interconnected global context 3.
45. Vietnam, doi moi and the search for business and economic strength and global relevance 10: considering Vietnam in an interconnected global context 4.

Orienting notes to this directory:

As a third orienting note to this series, I am still a member of the advisory group to the United Nations program, ict4Peace. And I have begun more actively engaging in UN processes and activities again and attending meetings as an active participant. I have also done a fairly significant amount of traveling in the past year and more, to East Africa, Southeast Asia and other places, and have been writing about infrastructure-related issues as they apply to those countries and regions, and perhaps more widely as well.

Timothy Platt, Ph.D.
March 4, 2015

I initially began posting to this directory in January, 2010 – just a few months after actively beginning this blog. I was still actively involved with the United Nations Global Alliance for ICT and Development (UN-GAID) as a pro bono consultant member of their private sector advisory group: the champions’ network. And at the time, my primary focus was on a still unfolding disaster taking place in Haiti.

• Haiti had just been severely damaged and on many levels by a natural disaster that would have been enough to strain any national infrastructure, and early response and recover effort resources,
• But this natural disaster reached the level of impact that it did because Haiti was already fragile and vulnerable as a society as a result of long-term human created problems (e.g. systematic widespread deforestation and other environmental degradation, and a lack of effective and reliable governmental infrastructure or governmental support for public sector infrastructure of any sort.)
• And the hurricanes hit and the level of harm created from them was incredible – even as Haiti lacked any capability on its own to even begin to mount an effective response.

And it was just before the natural disaster side of this began that the UN based leader of UN-GAID retired, and no one there was willing to step into his old agency leadership role to facilitate any response – even as the private sector members of its champions’ network and the businesses and organizations that they worked for – both nonprofit non-governmental organizations (NGO) and private sector corporations included, sought to contribute skills and resources to this problem and under umbrella UN leadership. So I posted about this challenge from the perspective of the more ad hoc approach that now former members of UN-GAID brought to bear as we came together on our own to try to contribute to an emergency response and recovery effort.

A new UN based program, ict4Peace has since been formed to fill the vacuum left from the demise of the UN-GAID, and its members were rolled over into being members of that new agency’s advisory group. And I am still listed as a member of this new agency’s consultants’ group but I have written my more recent postings to this directory, independently of any UN involvement. I cite in that regard, my 2013 postings on Tanzania as based on my then recent experience there (see my series: Developing Critical Infrastructure from a Human and a Societal Perspective, postings 16-21.)

Timothy Platt, Ph.D.
April 6, 2014

Note: I usually append new directory note updates to those that I would update and I do so here too. My original notes, initially added to this directory page in January, 2010 at the top of this page follow. I have moved my covering notes to the bottom of this page so my listings directory would show without any necessary scrolling:

When the Port au Prince area of Haiti was devastated by an earthquake in 2010, I shifted focus to one of redeveloping ICT and particularly communications capabilities as a key component to any effective emergency response or recovery effort. Subsequent postings included from there and added here are based upon white papers and emails sent as part of a developing dialog and effort, primarily on the part of the networking community that exists around and supports UN-GAID – its Champions Network.

Here, the focus starts with the crisis in Haiti but extends beyond that to the larger issues of more effectively preparing for the next major disaster, and with a faster and more immediately effective coordinated response.

Note that the postings included here are works in progress, and that I have not updated any of them in light of after the fact insight. So for example when references are made as to the potential for setting up steering committees for the Haiti response and for developing emergency response and recovery systems in general that simply reflected one approach that looked like it would be feasible at the initial time of writing. Everything here represents work and its supporting thinking and discussions in progress.

Timothy Platt, Ph.D.
January, 2010

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