Platt Perspective on Business and Technology

HR and personnel

This series explores a range of issues related to Human Resources as a core, strategically connect functionality in business, and in developing next generation capabilities and value for Human Resources departments.

1. Connecting an organization together, version 2.0.
2. Some thoughts towards a non-buzz word HR 2.0 and why.
3. Startups and more developed organizations – making sure the right people are in the right chairs.
4. Making Human Resources Relevant – 1.
5. Making Human Resources Relevant – 2.
6. Making Human Resources Relevant – 3.
7. Hiring for skills, hiring for fit – with requirements collisions and alignments.
8. Nonprofits – staffing and career potential.
9. Human Resources, hiring managers and spam resumes.
10. Human Resources and the due diligence of workplace discrimination threats.
11. Nonprofits, mission and employee morale.
12. Behavioral interviews as an effective tool for evaluation and screening.
13. 360 degree interviews – the hiring manager and HR perspective.
14. Expanding your business with a dual strategic focus – expanding your headcount?.
15. Workforce reductions, layoffs and other morale killers, and the need for transparency in Human Resources policies and processes.
16. Downsizing and mass lay-offs as a symptom of strategic failure.
17. The hidden costs of legacy systems – some thoughts on the larger picture.
18. Negotiating what you can offer as a hiring manager in building and maintaining great teams.
19. Negotiating what you can offer as a hiring manager in an ongoing social context.
20. Starting a new job, Building a new foundation – part 3 and HR department onboarding. This is the third installment of a series that can be found as postings 73 to 75 to this point in my Guide to Effective Job Search and Career Development.
21. Mentoring as a source of positive value to the business and to the mentor. (See also Starting a new job, Building a new foundation – part 7 and building a mentoring network for a discussion of this from the employee perspective.)
22. Knowing when to terminate and knowing how.
23. Consulting in the client’s context.
24. Performance reviews – setting and following best practices standards.
25. Reexamining business school fundamentals – human resources and managing personnel in an interconnected business context.
26. Effective operational execution means never taking your staff for granted.
27. From peer to supervisor – Part 1: moving into management.
28. From peer to supervisor – Part 2: management training opportunities.
29. From peer to supervisor – Part 3: managing through your first crisis.
30. From peer to supervisor – Part 4: budget constraints.
31. From peer to supervisor – Part 5: the table of organization and corporate culture.
32. Effective mentoring in spite of personality differences – the consultant and client context.
33. When job performance failure begins with the job description.
34. From peer to supervisor – Part 6: working with your team as individuals and as a group.
35. From peer to supervisor – Part 7: organizing tasks and team member job descriptions.
36. The danger of viewing personnel as human capital – a warning of change to come.
37. From peer to supervisor – Part 8: negotiating for resources as a team leader.
38. From peer to supervisor – Part 9: training and mentoring others.
39. From peer to supervisor – Part 10: leading through change.
40. From peer to supervisor – Part 11: employee problems and problem employees.
41. From peer to supervisor – Part 12: trust.
42. From peer to supervisor – Part 13: performing your first performance reviews.
43. From peer to supervisor – Part 14: your own first performance review as a new manager.
44. From peer to supervisor – Part 15: viewing your first management position in a wider perspective.
45. A critique of the Peter Principle – career as a series of growth and transition phases.
46. When a good question is better than a best answer.
47. Access, working in-house and consulting – understanding and working in the fundamental constraints at a job.
48. Keeping job descriptions and qualifications relevant.
49. Organizational flexibility and vitality, and a dichotomy of needs.
50. The balanced workforce – 1: Advancement and promotions.
51. The balanced workforce – 2: Staff retention and right-sizing.
52. Do your employees need you to motivate them? Building for self-motivation.
53. Confronting an empty desk – from the employee perspective: part 1 of a series.
54. Confronting an empty desk – from the manager and Human Resources perspective: part 2 of a series.
55. Confronting an empty desk – manager and HR, or manager versus HR: part 3 of a series.
56. Confronting an empty desk – when a colleague is injured or dies: part 4 of a series.
57. Confronting workplace discrimination – Part 1: a multi-facetted challenge.
58. Confronting workplace discrimination – Part 2: developing and setting standards.
59. Confronting workplace discrimination – Part 3: when problems develop.
60. Confronting workplace discrimination – Part 4: what is discrimination and where?
61. What level is that job? What title should it carry?.
62. Social media based candidate screening and its risk remediation considerations.
63. Developing a rational compensation package policy – 1: some general organizing principles.
64. Developing a rational compensation package policy – 2: structuring compensation according to the standard model.
65. Best practices for building a better table of organization – 1: building and organizing from a basic conceptual framework.
66. Developing a rational compensation package policy – 3: structuring compensation to address critical needs positions hiring requirements.
67. Best practices for building a better table of organization – 2: building in terms of the specific organization.
68. Developing a rational compensation package policy – 4: new hires for standard and critical needs positions.
69. Best practices for building a better table of organization – 3: flattening the table.
70. Developing a rational compensation package policy – 5: developing a functionality and functional-needs based compensation policy – 1.
71. Best practices for building a better table of organization – 4: building the functionality and value driven organization.
72. Developing a rational compensation package policy – 6: developing a functionality and functional-needs based compensation policy – 2.
73. Navigating the bring your own tech puzzle – 1: building a framework for understanding and managing this emerging trend.
74. Best practices for building a better table of organization – 5: building functional flexibility from a stable organizational core.
75. Navigating the bring your own tech puzzle – 2: who owns IT?.
76. Navigating the bring your own tech puzzle – 3: connecting IT and HR policy and practice.
77. Navigating the bring your own tech puzzle – 4: cyber-security and related due diligence concerns.
78. Reconsidering how work is structured 1 – going beyond the standard in-house employee and consultant model.
79. Making leadership not just about you.
80. Reconsidering how work is structured 2 – working in-house, working off-site and in between.
81. Developing management and leadership skills in others – 1: starting a new series.
82. Developing management and leadership skills in others – 2: mentors and mentees 1.
83. Developing management and leadership skills in others – 3: mentors and mentees 2.
84. Developing management and leadership skills in others – 4: mentoring versus favoritism and building a mentoring culture.
85. Developing management and leadership skills in others – 5: teaching management skills.
86. When leadership means accepting the need for unpleasant conversations.
87. Developing management and leadership skills in others – 6: teaching leadership skills.
88. Developing management and leadership skills in others – 7: teaching mentoring skills.
89. Leadership and setting priorities in the face of disagreement.
90. Technology advancement and the productivity paradox – 1: the need for a technology inclusion and implementation policy.
91. Leadership and building effective strategy out of compelling needs.
92. Technology advancement and the productivity paradox – 2: planning for an effective technology implementation policy.
93. Hiring 101 – 1: rethinking skills and experience requirements and priorities.
94. Technology advancement and the productivity paradox – 3: unique value propositions and blue ocean strategies.
95. Hiring 101 – 2: interpersonal skills and fit to corporate culture.
96. Technology advancement and the productivity paradox – 4: the selection, implementation and phase-out cycle 1.
97. Hiring 101 – 3: workforce diversity and the challenges of discrimination.
98. Technology advancement and the productivity paradox – 5: the selection, implementation and phase-out cycle 2.
99. Hiring 101 – 4: the hiring process itself – 1: first cut candidate screenings.
100. Hiring 101 – 5: the hiring process itself – 2: the second stage candidate selection process.
101. Hiring 101 – 6: the hiring process itself – 3: first round interviews.
102. Finding and managing the right simplicity complexity balance 8: information technology enablers 3. (See Business Strategy and Operations – 2 for a complete listing of this series’ installments beginning with posting 262 as listed there.)
103. Hiring 101 – 7: the hiring process itself – 4: interviewing your top candidates.
104. Finding and managing the right simplicity complexity balance 9: information technology enablers 4. (See Business Strategy and Operations – 2 for a complete listing of this series’ installments.)
105. Hiring 101 – 8: connecting employee hiring and performance review processes and practices .
106. Hiring 101 – 9: identifying and remediating ad hoc gaps in your hiring processes.
107. Employee training and development, and the creation and retention of value -1: starting a new series.
108. Staff retention by company cafeteria – quality of life incentives and their return on investment.
109. Employee training and development, and the creation and retention of value -2: baseline determinations of what training and for whom.
110. A tale of two job candidates – and the need to focus on the right candidate strengths.
111. Employee training and development, and the creation and retention of value -3: company-required options and resources.
112. Leadership as a function of selective focus.
113. Employee training and development, and the creation and retention of value -4: employee-requested and optional resources.
114. Employee training and development, and the creation and retention of value -5: involving the full range of stakeholders.
115. Leadership as navigation through mistakes.
116. Employee training and development, and the creation and retention of value -6: in-house versus outsourced training.
117. Employee training and development, and the creation and retention of value -7: two paradigmatic visions of the employee’s role.
118. Employee training and development, and the creation and retention of value -8: alignment with overall business policy and strategy.
119. Onboarding new employees 101 – 1: the basic goal of an effective onboarding process.
120. Onboarding new employees 101 – 2: preparing for a new hire’s day one on their new job.
121. Onboarding new employees 101 – 3: day one on the new job.
122. Onboarding new employees 101 – 4: next steps beyond day one.
123. Onboarding new employees 101 – 5: preparing for and carrying through on the first performance review – 1.
124. Developing and managing productivity tools so as to encourage and promote productivity – 1.
125. Onboarding new employees 101 – 6: preparing for and carrying through on the first performance review – 2.
126. Developing and managing productivity tools so as to encourage and promote productivity – 2.
127. Onboarding new employees 101 – 7: the 360 degree onboarding perspective and its imperatives.
128. Onboarding new employees 101 – 8: documenting the process.
129. Developing and managing productivity tools so as to encourage and promote productivity – 3.
130. Onboarding new employees 101 – 9: improving chances of success and making the transition in a lot smoother.
131. Onboarding new employees 101 – 10: onboarding in a heavily regulated industry and for positions requiring security clearance.
132. Onboarding new employees 101 – 11: nondisclosure agreements, new and old.
133. Onboarding new employees 101 – 12: cultural diversity and awareness, and avoiding discrimination pitfalls.
134. When and if it might make sense to outsource Human Resources 1.
135. Onboarding new employees 101 – 13: lessons learned and completing the cycle.
136. When and if it might make sense to outsource Human Resources 2.
137. Human Resources and adaptation to change 1: the many faces of change.
138. When and if it might make sense to outsource Human Resources 3.
139. Human Resources and adaptation to change 2: building a baseline for comparison for organizational opportunity and challenge 1.
140. When and if it might make sense to outsource Human Resources 4.
141. When and if it might make sense to outsource Human Resources 5.
142. Human Resources and adaptation to change 3: building a baseline for comparison for organizational opportunity and challenge 2.
143. When and if it might make sense to outsource Human Resources 6.
144. Human Resources and adaptation to change 4: adding in the complexity of innovation and market-driven pressures to innovate.
145. When and if it might make sense to outsource Human Resources 7.
146. Human Resources and adaptation to change 5: adding the complexity of highly fluctuating headcount needs.
147. When and if it might make sense to outsource Human Resources 8.
148. Human Resources and adaptation to change 6: issues that arise for internationally and globally distributed businesses.
149. Human Resources and adaptation to change 7: in the context of lean and agile businesses.
150. Human Resources and adaptation to change 8: in the context of change management challenges.
151. Human Resources and adaptation to change 9: in a deeply interconnected and interdependent context.
152. Human Resources and adaptation to change 10: mergers and acquisitions.
153. Human Resources and adaptation to change 11: reconsidering HR in a changing, evolving business environment.
154. Innovators, innovation teams and the innovation process 1 – an organizational and functional story.
155. Innovators, innovation teams and the innovation process 2 – identifying, developing and supporting the individual innovator 1.
156. Innovators, innovation teams and the innovation process 3 – identifying, developing and supporting the individual innovator 2.
157. Innovators, innovation teams and the innovation process 4 – identifying, developing and supporting the individual innovator 3.
158. Innovators, innovation teams and the innovation process 5 – building the innovative organization.
159. Innovators, innovation teams and the innovation process 6 – applied and blue-sky innovation and innovators.
160. Innovators, innovation teams and the innovation process 7 – acquiring innovation from outside of the organization 1.
161. Innovators, innovation teams and the innovation process 8 – acquiring innovation from outside of the organization 2.
162. Innovators, innovation teams and the innovation process 9 – acquiring innovation from outside of the organization 3.
163. Innovators, innovation teams and the innovation process 10 – acquiring innovation from outside of the organization 4.
164. Innovators, innovation teams and the innovation process 11 – acquiring innovation through crowdsourcing as a special case 1.
165. If you want your company to be more innovative 1: improve the cafeteria.
166. If you want your company to be more innovative 2: build a creative commons area for a single business location.
167. Innovators, innovation teams and the innovation process 12 – acquiring innovation through crowdsourcing as a special case 2.
168. If you want your company to be more innovative 3: connecting a geographically dispersed workforce and adding in online commons areas to accompany an office-sited commons.
169. Innovators, innovation teams and the innovation process 13 – deciding where and how to source what types of innovations 1.
170. If you want your company to be more innovative 4: accommodating and thriving on cultural diversity.
171. Innovators, innovation teams and the innovation process 14 – deciding where and how to source what types of innovations 2.
172. If you want your company to be more innovative 5: thinking and executing in terms of the triple bottom line.
173. Innovators, innovation teams and the innovation process 15 – sourcing innovation from an HR and Personnel perspective.
174. If you want your company to be more innovative 6: communication and innovation openness in the face of due diligence barriers 1.
175. Innovators, innovation teams and the innovation process 16 – strategically involving and including Human Resources in the innovative process and its facilitation.
176. If you want your company to be more innovative 7: communication and innovation openness in the face of due diligence barriers 2.
177. Innovators, innovation teams and the innovation process 17 – operationalizing a drive for innovative excellence into HR and its ongoing practices and processes 1.
178. If you want your company to be more innovative 8: communication and innovation openness in the face of due diligence barriers 3.
179. Innovators, innovation teams and the innovation process 18 – operationalizing a drive for innovative excellence into HR and its ongoing practices and processes 2.
180. If you want your company to be more innovative 9: communication and innovation openness in the face of due diligence barriers 4.
181. Innovators, innovation teams and the innovation process 19 – long-term considerations and building collaborative innovation into the overall strategic process.
182. Leadership as turning goals into commitment and follow-through.
183. Human Resources audits 101 – 1: starting a new series.
184. Human Resources audits 101 – 2: strategically selected metrics as performance tools.
185. Human Resources audits 101 – 3: operational exceptions and problems.
186. Human Resources audits 101 – 4: adding in outside regulatory and reporting requirement complexities 1.
187. Human Resources audits 101 – 5: adding in outside regulatory and reporting requirement complexities 2.
188. Human Resources audits 101 – 6: completing the circle and making HR an overall strategic asset and resource.
189. Information policy best practices 4: the Finance and Human Resources departments’ perspectives. For other postings to this series see Business Strategy and Operations – 3, postings 457 and loosely following.
190. Meshing Human Resources processes with business complexity 1: starting a new series.
191. Meshing Human Resources processes with business complexity 2: rethinking workplace requirements 1.
192. Meshing Human Resources processes with business complexity 3: due diligence and risk management evaluations 1
193. Meshing Human Resources processes with business complexity 4: due diligence and risk management evaluations 2.
194. Meshing Human Resources processes with business complexity 5: due diligence and risk management evaluations 3.
195. Meshing Human Resources processes with business complexity 6: rethinking workplace requirements 2.
196. Meshing Human Resources processes with business complexity 7: audits and performance benchmarking, and bringing terms of employment considerations into the overall business-level strategic process.
197. Exceptions and exception handling from the HR perspective 1: starting a new series.
198. Exceptions and exception handling from the HR perspective 2: outside consultants and contract workers 1.
199. Exceptions and exception handling from the HR perspective 3: outside consultants and contract workers 2.
200. Exceptions and exception handling from the HR perspective 4: outside consultants and contract workers 3.

This guide is continued, starting with directory posting 201 at HR and Personnel – 2.

Advertisements

One Response

Subscribe to comments with RSS.

  1. […] for careers and organizational advancement in them. Note: I have also been including this series in HR and Personnel and I have added other material related to management there as […]


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: